Bobby and his Young Criminals' Starvation League's latest is a frothy, brilliant, genre-bending mongrel. There are dreamy pop songs sung by folks not ready to turn their backs on the visceral joys of gutter punk, a a shameless embrace of groovy SoCal country rock, sharp, soulful Stax-style horn Blasts, R&B swagger, and a love of the Brill Building, the Ryman Auditorium, CBGB's and the gas station outside Memphis where the van broke down. It's a beautiful funny, heartbreaking, ambitious, hypnotic, lovesick and lovelorn lyrical knockout.
Bobby and his Young Criminals' Starvation League's latest is a frothy, brilliant, genre-bending mongrel. There are dreamy pop songs sung by folks not ready to turn their backs on the visceral joys of gutter punk, a a shameless embrace of groovy SoCal country rock, sharp, soulful Stax-style horn Blasts, R&B swagger, and a love of the Brill Building, the Ryman Auditorium, CBGB's and the gas station outside Memphis where the van broke down. It's a beautiful funny, heartbreaking, ambitious, hypnotic, lovesick and lovelorn lyrical knockout.
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From The End Of Your Leash
Artist: Bobby Bare Jr.
Format: CD
New: Available 10.98
Wish

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Bobby and his Young Criminals' Starvation League's latest is a frothy, brilliant, genre-bending mongrel. There are dreamy pop songs sung by folks not ready to turn their backs on the visceral joys of gutter punk, a a shameless embrace of groovy SoCal country rock, sharp, soulful Stax-style horn Blasts, R&B swagger, and a love of the Brill Building, the Ryman Auditorium, CBGB's and the gas station outside Memphis where the van broke down. It's a beautiful funny, heartbreaking, ambitious, hypnotic, lovesick and lovelorn lyrical knockout.

Reviews:

First with Bare Jr. and now with the Young Criminals' Starvation League, Bobby Bare Jr. has carved a niche for himself by playing a distinctive synthesis of rock, country and folk. Combining lessons learned from growing up as the son of minor country deity Bobby Bare and the passion of his teenage garage punk rebellion, Bare Jr. writes songs of unflinching honesty, playing them with no regard for genre borders and croaking them out like a mutant blend of early Tom Waits and everyone who ever sang for Dr. Hook.

On From the End of Your Leash, his fifth album in his various incarnations, Bare Jr. assembles an all-star cast (including Andrew Bird, Will Oldham, Duane Denison, Paul Burch and Paul Niehaus) to populate the latest additions to his eccentric songbook. In "Visit Me in Music City," his first songwriting collaboration with his father, Bare Jr. explores the fantasies and realities of life in Nashville (from "Guitar strings grow on shrubs and maple trees..." to "Come and visit me in Music City, we'll drink all night and write songs no one will sing...") against a jaunty country melody, "Valentine" is Bare Jr.'s soul/pop/punk take on the murder ballad, and "Borrow Your Girl" plays like Springsteen's lost Nashville sessions. In less skilled hands, this number of sonic touchpoints would result in a headsplitting cacophony, but with equal measures of subtlety and intensity, Bobby Bare Jr. manages to make his quirks sound as natural as a hit record on Music Row.

"First with Bare Jr. and now with the Young Criminals' Starvation League, Bobby Bare Jr. has carved a niche for himself by playing a distinctive synthesis of rock, country and folk. Combining lessons learned from growing up as the son of minor country deity Bobby Bare and the passion of his teenage garage punk rebellion, Bare Jr. writes songs of unflinching honesty, playing them with no regard for genre borders and croaking them out like a mutant blend of early Tom Waits and everyone who ever sang for Dr. Hook.

On From the End of Your Leash, his fifth album in his various incarnations, Bare Jr. assembles an all-star cast (including Andrew Bird, Will Oldham, Duane Denison, Paul Burch and Paul Niehaus) to populate the latest additions to his eccentric songbook. In ""Visit Me in Music City,"" his first songwriting collaboration with his father, Bare Jr. explores the fantasies and realities of life in Nashville (from ""Guitar strings grow on shrubs and maple trees..."" to ""Come and visit me in Music City, we'll drink all night and write songs no one will sing..."") against a jaunty country melody, ""Valentine"" is Bare Jr.'s soul/pop/punk take on the murder ballad, and ""Borrow Your Girl"" plays like Springsteen's lost Nashville sessions. In less skilled hands, this number of sonic touchpoints would result in a headsplitting cacophony, but with equal measures of subtlety and intensity, Bobby Bare Jr. manages to make his quirks sound as natural as a hit record on Music Row.

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